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What is the Best Material to Build a Home With?

All different kinds of materials have been used to build a house. People have used wood, straw, brick and concrete. When you look at the materials, you also need to look and see what you want to accomplish. The materials need to accomplish the following:

a. materials must be used that can absorb a little bit of moisture and also get rid of the moisture without damaging the material

b. materials must be used that repel a large amount of water from leaks so that leaks will be discovered and repaired before mold is formed

c. materials must form a moisture barrier near the middle of the wall

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The density of the material is an important characteristic to consider when choosing the best material to build a house with. At one time, people thought that the denser the material, the better the material to use. Through testing and field experience, it has been shown that materials denser than concrete can form mold in a very short period of time and this is even when exposed directly to sun and air.

The best materials to use to resist mold is dense concrete. When the materials that makes up concrete start to cement, or harden, the PH that is produced may help to prevent the growth of mold. The moisture that makes it way in can also make its way back out before mold and mildew are formed. For less dense concrete or porous concrete, water and moisture goes in and keeps traveling in and farther away from the edges on the outside of the concrete. This means that it takes longer for the water to be removed and thus allows mold and mildew to form.

List Of Building Materials For A House

This article has discussed when choosing materials to build the house with, what they must be able to do and which material is the best material to use to meet the goals set forth when getting ready to build the house.

Green Building - Sustainable Materials For Home Construction

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An increasing majority of people have acknowledged the fact that we all can cooperate to help alleviate the stress put on environment, and if we all do a little together, it will have a big impact. One of the easiest things to do is to use sustainable resources in our buildings. It sounds good, but what precisely are sustainable materials? Well, here's a little assistance in understanding this part of the "green revolution."

To understand and recognize what constitutes sustainable building materials, it helps to know the definition of sustainability. Essentially, it means that the use of resources by humans takes place in a manner that conserves the resources for the future. If that sounds a little too obscure, think of it as a system that uses resources that renew themselves. Focusing in a little more, two examples of sustainability would be the use of wood for building. Because forests can regenerate, the wood that is used for building is replenished as more trees grow and mature. A different direction would be the use of steel for construction. Here, the concept is not the regeneration of the supply but the ability to recycle the resource and use it over and over again.

It's easy to recognize sustainable materials and integrate them into your building plans. If you can replenish it, then you can bet that it is sustainable. Aside from wood, great renewable supplies are plant materials such as bamboo and straw. Others illustrations include clay, coconut, seagrass and cork. Nature continually produces wonderful products for our homes that, if used sensibly, we will never run out of.

The other aspect to sustainability is recyclable materials. Many metals are recyclable. You can use these materials for things like floors, walls and countertops. You can also get recycled stone to use as a material as well

Part of achieving sustainability is to watch your energy consumption. When you are considering which materials to purchase for your building project, consider the quantity of energy required to transport such a material. If you truly want something like granite countertops, consider purchasing granite from a manufacturer that is located nearby, rather than from another country. Think about all of the wasted energy that goes into transporting a piece of granite from Malaysia. A local manufacturer will use a reduced amount of energy to get the material delivered.

Making sure that an environmentally friendly property is on target takes more than just using sustainable materials. Employing the ideology of sustainability is only one part of the process. The rest of it includes using the right materials with the right architecture and correct construction techniques to make a complete system. Manage your water consumption, the energy efficiency of the property, and integrate your building site with the rest of the surrounding property. Remember, that your goal is to make a home that takes as little as possible from nature.

Keep in mind that you shouldn't expect to make your home sustainable all at one time. It's just an issue of considering different materials than you might have considered before. When you need new countertops, think about using cork instead of granite. Instead of tile for your floors, think about bamboo. Instead of paint, think about covering your walls with natural fibers, which will actually improve your air quality. In a matter of time you will have created an eco-friendly and sustainable home to call your own.

What Construction Material is the Best For a Hurricane Proof House?

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Do you need a backyard storage shed, but feel you cannot afford the high cost of building materials? Have you ever contemplated building a summer cabin or perhaps a house but the cost of materials is prohibitive? These projects may seem like something you would just as soon leave to the hired professionals, especially for us carpentry challenged folks, but what if you just want materials for a planter to showcase your special flowers or a new home for "Fido"? I am about to make a bold proclamation by stating that you can get the materials you need for FREE! Yes, you heard it right...FREE! "How," you ask, "might this be possible?" Listen closely my friends, and I will show you how to do just that.

Before we begin, I should let you in on the only two things you will need to accomplish this seemingly impossible task of finding free materials...patience, and flexibility. The reasoning behind these two very important attributes shall become clear as we move along.

The first step is to decide what materials you need for your project, and also some alternatives that will work if necessary. This is where the flexibility comes in. You may not get the "exact" materials you need, but some alternatives are just as good. Suppose you are building a deck on the summer cabin. If you are vying for a position in the "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous" you probably wouldn't read this far into this article, so I am guessing that functionality and price considerations are more important than beautiful craftsmanship. I would suggest using pallets as a starting point. They are sturdy, easy to assemble, and readily available. Plus they can be covered later for a more aesthetic appearance. We built a porch on our cabin using pallets that we covered with decking material that we later found. Check lumberyards, electrical/plumbing supply outlets, door and window shops, just about any place that receives large shipments of merchandise. These places are easily identified by the monstrous stacks of pallets in the alley or behind the building, and most places will give you as many as you want. Electric companies are also good sources for the large wire spools that make excellent patio tables, birdbath stands, and any other use you might imagine.

Always be on the lookout for neighbors and others that are doing their own remodeling projects. They often have discarded materials and are happy to give them away rather than having them hauled off at their expense. For our cabin, we asked a home remodeler for unwanted materials and that's where we acquired the doors, windows, roof sheathing, stove pipe, screws, nails, among other things.

Many times you might find elderly residents who would love to have their yard cleared of years worth of accumulated stuff, but they are incapable of doing the job themselves and not financially able to hire someone to do it for them. Make a deal to clean their yard in exchange for the materials.

Local lumber mills have mountains of byproduct that is unusable for their purposes but perfect for many homeowner projects. Check with the office for availability and restrictions.

Old discarded tires are strewn all over the countryside, but may just turn into a beautiful landscape piece for the artistic homeowner, or filled with cement to become shed supports. Automobile junkyards may offer useable materials for the visionary builder...use your imagination. Pickup bench seats can be conformed into unusual but classic breakfast niche booth seats.

You will most assuredly have more success in your quest for free materials if you become a Classified Ad reader. Read them every day. Look for anything that says "free" but be sure to call early because these things go fast. There is a gold mine waiting to be had for the asking. Many times you might find free items just because you are willing to haul them away. If you are really energetic, you may find an ad for a house to be torn down in exchange for the materials. Here is a great source for lumber, bricks and blocks, trusses, windows, doors, plumbing fixtures, and the list goes on.

New construction sites offer a plethora of material gathering options. Many times there will be a huge dumpster on site for material discards that may be just the thing you are looking for. You may find dimension lumber, insulation, electrical wiring, PVC pipe, etc. Please be sure to check with the construction foreman before taking these materials.

If you happen to need "like new" building materials without the exorbitant cost, check your surrounding communities for a salvage lumberyard. These establishments offer "scratch and dent" or otherwise rejected building materials at substantial discounts.

As you can see, there are endless possibilities when it comes to recycling "pre-owned" building materials, but a better price cannot be found. Forethought must be applied and sometimes you must patiently wait for the perfect opportunity, but the end result will be well worth the effort. Just keep your eyes open and don't be afraid to think outside the box.